How and Why You Should Give Buyers What They Want

Attention, service providers! To some of you, this is preaching to the choir, but I think a new Hinge study (via MarketingProfs) can teach those of you in accounting, marketing, legal, consulting, or tech firms how you should be “selling” yourselves.

 1,000 buyers stated the most commonly used resources for evaluations of professional services were:

  1. Service providers’ websites (81%)
    Translation: Make sure your website is in tip-top shape, from user experience to conversion potential to resourcefulness.
  2. Online search (63%)
    Translation: SEO and content marketing are going to help you get found, whether from organic or paid search results.
  3. Asking friends/colleagues whether they’ve heard of the person/firm (62%)
    Translation: Making a (good) name for yourself is essential.
  4. Using social media (60%)
    Translation: Obviously an extension of #3, you need to be aware of what questions people are asking about the services you provide … and what they’re saying/asking about your company.
  5.  Talking to references provided by the seller (55%)
    Translation: Keep customers happy ecstatic, and they will want to share that enthusiasm with others.

In light of these areas I would like to add that the original root words for sell mean “to serve,” as noted by renowned sales author Jill Konrath—who recently conducted a workshop at Fathom.

The notion of customer service being important may seem cliche or obvious, but extending its reach to the sales realm has serious ramifications. I would argue that the underlying question behind everything your business does to create new customers or retain existing customers should be:

Are you truly serving? 

In other words, are you meeting unmet needs and providing answers to questions even unasked? From every interaction a customer has with your business, from first point of contact to ongoing communication as a longtime loyal advocate, are you making them feel great about what you do?

Paul Richlovsky

About Paul Richlovsky

Paul brings a writing and teaching background to his decade-long marketing career. He advises clients on content strategy and editorial direction. He is an enthusiastic marketing automation practitioner and active member of the Cleveland Marketo User Group. He has written/edited multiple marketing guides, including those aimed at healthcare, higher education, financial services, B2C brands and manufacturing audiences. With a BA in English from the College of Wooster, he is also the author of a collection of poetry, "Under the Lunar Neon."He is particularly interested in usability, digital governance, ballroom dancing, bachata, racquet sports, and romping with his niece and nephews.

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