We all know that the marketer’s ultimate goal for retail Web page visitors is conversion. We want the consumer to read the product descriptions, learn more about the merchandise or service, and ultimately be so convinced that it is exactly what they have been looking for they take the plunge right then and there. They make the purchase, download a manual, or request more information.

But sometimes the consumers need a little push. After possibly scrolling through many similar pages, they need something to make them take the plunge and actually make a purchase or supply their email address. Here is where a call-to-action can help. It lets customers know exactly what to do next. A few call-to-action options include:

  • Buy now
  • Shop today
  • Click here for more information
  • Add your name to our email list to learn more
  • Shop women’s
  • Men’s shirts on sale
  • Download the free manual now

This is just a sample of some viable options. Calls-to-action like “shop women’s” and “men’s shirts on sale” help direct the shopper to exactly the desired place on the website without thinking. People can be impatient if they don’t find exactly what they are looking for right away, so putting some of a company’s biggest sellers as click-ready buttons or text can be helpful and save time.

Other call-to-action ideas such as “add your name to our email list” may not get immediate shopping results, but this can help gain long-term customers. This gives access to potential customers to entice with discounts or notices about the newest products or services.

Calls-to-action should be kept simple and include visual elements. If there is an entire paragraph of clickable text, a consumer is likely to just gloss right over it. Using short, eye-catching phrases is best. Free trials or memberships are excellent (if applicable). Everyone likes free.

Calls-to-action can be clickable phrases, tabs at the top of the Web page or even buttons made to stand out and look like actual 3D buttons. This makes it even easier for the consumer to know where to click to find the wanted product or service. In the end, we are trying to convince the consumer to click and purchase this merchandise or supply information, so think about phrasing that would make us want to click on it ourselves.

For additional insights, check out “Call-to-Action 101.”

Megan Buemi

About Megan Buemi

Megan comes from an editorial and project management background in both the public relations and textbook industries. After editing press releases and managing the textbook creation process, she now resides as a digital content specialist on the retail team at Fathom, editing, optimizing and writing Web content for clients. She graduated with a BA in communications from Kent State University with a focus on interpersonal communication. Megan is always happy to work with her team and clients to find the best solutions possible to suit business needs. Megan has a passion for animal rights and spends her free time playing with her rescue dogs, exercising at Pure Barre classes, reading and spending time with family and friends.

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