Content Strategy, ROI & Staffing: Is Your Marketing Job Secure?

strategoA recent report from The Creative Group shows 73% of U.S. advertising/marketing executives say their organizations plan to maintain their current staffing levels in the 2nd half of 2014. Alternative plans for the 2nd half of 2014 include:

  • 12%: Expand staff
  • 12%: Freeze hiring
  • 3%: Reduce staff

First, let’s note that if only 3% plan on cutting staff, that’s good news for marketers everywhere … assuming they’re doing their jobs well. And the fact that almost three-fourths of these execs want to maintain the status quo, in addition to 12% expanding, is very favorable news overall.

I can’t help but pair this stat with another one I discovered recently: 28% of marketers believe they understand the ROI of their content (via Marketo).  No, that’s not a typo. In other words, roughly three-quarters are not understanding the dollar value of their content. When content marketing is as popular and prized as it is (and given the sophistication of Web analytics), the value should be transparent and easily determined. No matter which way you quantify or qualify the value, if only 28% believe they understand it, that’s not enough! Plus, if they’re not understanding it, then how are their customers and bosses understanding it—bosses responsible for professional development and job security?

Furthermore, 49% of B2B marketers don’t even have a documented content strategy, according to the same source. What does this mean? Despite the expected positive trends in hiring for the rest of this year, we marketers should not be so secure in our jobs that we overlook the twin imperatives of having a content strategy and understanding the ROI of content.

Are marketers valuing content marketing? A recent survey from Regalix suggests so: It found 73% of them (there’s that number again!) creating content as a part of their organic search marketing. All parties—marketing execs, content directors, specialists, and customers alike—would benefit from documenting the purpose of content and connecting it to revenue.

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Photo courtesy of John Meyer via Flickr.

Paul Richlovsky

About Paul Richlovsky

Paul brings a writing and teaching background to his decade-long marketing career. He advises clients on content strategy and editorial direction. He is an enthusiastic marketing automation practitioner and active member of the Cleveland Marketo User Group. He has written/edited multiple marketing guides, including those aimed at healthcare, higher education, financial services, B2C brands and manufacturing audiences. With a BA in English from the College of Wooster, he is also the author of a collection of poetry, "Under the Lunar Neon."He is particularly interested in usability, digital governance, ballroom dancing, bachata, racquet sports, and romping with his niece and nephews.

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